New Year's at Okonomi
 

For many, the world of savory breakfasts - and especially that which includes fish and seafood - is a strange and unfamiliar realm. Such is the menu at Okonomi, a restaurant serving Japanese breakfast in Brooklyn. Typically, it includes miso soup, a bowl of rice, and a main protein with a few side dishes. I love it. Seldom do I feel as satisfied in my need for new and varied flavors - while also being able to lie to my body that I’ve seen the light of health - as I do when I eat Japanese food. And what better than to do so for the most important meal of the day. Recently, I got to try their osechi ryori, or traditional foods eaten on New Year’s, which is a special, larger course meal that they offer during the first few days of the new year. Ah, the sweet taste of symbolic good fortune.

Everyday:

Counterclockwise from the bottom: mackerel, simply grilled with sea salt; ??; sea cucumber, which I’d never had before but had a surprisingly meaty texture; radish salad; sweet oyster with lemon zest and sancho pepper; swiss chard with miso sauce; and omelette. Miso soup in the bottom right, poached egg with added-on uni in upper right.

Counterclockwise from the bottom: mackerel, simply grilled with sea salt; ??; sea cucumber, which I’d never had before but had a surprisingly meaty texture; radish salad; sweet oyster with lemon zest and sancho pepper; swiss chard with miso sauce; and omelette. Miso soup in the bottom right, poached egg with added-on uni in upper right.

 
Mackerel cooked with sake lees. They do not only offer mackerel, but it’s one of my favorite, so I tend to order it whenever it’s on a menu.

Mackerel cooked with sake lees. They do not only offer mackerel, but it’s one of my favorite, so I tend to order it whenever it’s on a menu.

Okonomi Brooklyn

Osechi:

- King Mackerel Miso-zuke: miso-marinated, roasted king mackerel. Roasted fish is a prayer for a successful career.  - Namasu: pickled carrot and daikon. Orange and white are celebratory colors.  - Ebi No Umani: simmered shrimp. For long life - the bent back antennae look like an old man.  - Datemaki: sweet, rolled omelette. A wish for development of culture and learning.  - Nishime: braised gobo, carrot, and lotus root. Gobo to bring health and abundant harvest, lotus root for unobstructed view of the year to come.  - Kurikinton: sweet potato with candied chestnuts. Will bring wealth and prosperity in the new year.  - Kuromame: sweet black beans. For good health.

- King Mackerel Miso-zuke: miso-marinated, roasted king mackerel. Roasted fish is a prayer for a successful career.

- Namasu: pickled carrot and daikon. Orange and white are celebratory colors.

- Ebi No Umani: simmered shrimp. For long life - the bent back antennae look like an old man.

- Datemaki: sweet, rolled omelette. A wish for development of culture and learning.

- Nishime: braised gobo, carrot, and lotus root. Gobo to bring health and abundant harvest, lotus root for unobstructed view of the year to come.

- Kurikinton: sweet potato with candied chestnuts. Will bring wealth and prosperity in the new year.

- Kuromame: sweet black beans. For good health.

Sashimi: big eye tuna, striped bass, and bright red ikura with yuzu kosho. Red and white represent the Japanese flag.  Ozoni: clam broth with mochi. Stretchy mochi symbolizes longevity.  Multigrain Rice  Poached Egg

Sashimi: big eye tuna, striped bass, and bright red ikura with yuzu kosho. Red and white represent the Japanese flag.

Ozoni: clam broth with mochi. Stretchy mochi symbolizes longevity.

Multigrain Rice

Poached Egg

 

Date: February 2015, April 2018, January 2019

Camera: Nikon D40, Leica Q